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21

Feb

resetnetwork:

Legends abound of people getting struck by lightning and suddenly being able to play Bach piano concertos effortlessly. Is this kind of brainpower boost for real? Professor Allan Snyder, of Sydney University’s Centre of the Mind, seems to think so: he’s been working on a literal “thinking cap” for over a decade now. Snyder believes that with the right kind of stimulus, a person’s brain functions can be successfully enhanced for a certain period of time. In his experiments, he zaps willing participants’ brains with low-level electric boosts, and finds that they are 40% more capable of “new modes of thinking.”

 I want one.

resetnetwork:

Legends abound of people getting struck by lightning and suddenly being able to play Bach piano concertos effortlessly. Is this kind of brainpower boost for real? Professor Allan Snyder, of Sydney University’s Centre of the Mind, seems to think so: he’s been working on a literal “thinking cap” for over a decade now. Snyder believes that with the right kind of stimulus, a person’s brain functions can be successfully enhanced for a certain period of time. In his experiments, he zaps willing participants’ brains with low-level electric boosts, and finds that they are 40% more capable of “new modes of thinking.”

 I want one.

07

Jan

Musician and researcher Charles Limb wondered how the brain works during musical improvisation — so he put jazz musicians and rappers in an fMRI to find out. What he and his team found has deep implications for our understanding of creativity of all kinds.

Looks like science and art are getting closer every day.

27

Oct

Feeling Sad Makes Us More Creative (The Frontal Cortex)

psychotherapy:

For thousands of years, people have speculated that there’s some correlation between sadness and creativity, so that people who are a little bit miserable (think Van Gogh, or Dylan in 1965, or Virginia Woolf) are also the most innovative. Aristotle was there first, stating in the 4th century B.C.E. “that all men who have attained excellence in philosophy, in poetry, in art and in politics, even Socrates and Plato, had a melancholic habitus; indeed some suffered even from melancholic disease.” This belief was revived during the Renaissance, leading Milton to exclaim, in his poem Il Penseroso: “Hail, divinest melancholy/whose saintly visage is too bright/to hit the sense of human sight.” The romantic poets took the veneration of sadness to its logical extreme, and described suffering as a prerequisite for the literary life. As Keats wrote, “Do you not see how necessary a World of Pains and troubles is to school an intelligence and make it a soul?”

Well, it turns out the cliché might be true after all: Angst has creative perks. That, at least, is the conclusion of Modupe Akinola, a professor at Columbia Business School, in her paper “The Dark Side of Creativity: Biological Vulnerability and Negative Emotions Lead to Greater Artistic Creativity”…